Fall Equinox: Pictures Worth a Thousand Words

Fall Equinox: Pictures Worth a Thousand Words

Share

Happy Autumn (as of 8:29 PM, September 22)!

“What remains is autumn, when the temperature seems perfect, the fish bite a little quicker and aspens, oaks and maples change colors, turning the mountains into an artist’s palette.” – Tom Wharton, Salt Lake Tribune, 2011

Autumn is my favorite time of year.  In celebration of the change of seasons, I turn to photographer Scott Law, who has published incredible images under a Flickr Creative Commons license since 2009.  These images, taken in fall 2013, capture the Lake in all its breathtaking Autumn glory.  Have a look:

The Cracks are Cracking. This image is especially poignant right now.  Autumn is when the Lake falls to its lowest levels in the year-long cycle of ebb and flow, and 2014 approached records that even got the attention of the Washington Post.  Today, the Lake elevation is measured at 4,193.4, just over 2 feet above it’s historic low, and as the Post said:

“The lake is at its lowest from October to November, which means there are still a few months to go before it bottoms out for the year.” Washington Post, August 22, 2014

The Front. Fall often comes with spectacular storms that carry the scent of the Lake into the city – which always takes me outside, eyes closed, to breathe it in.  I also love this image because of the blooming yellow sagebrush, which was always a harbinger of change in my childhood.

Puddles. I love this photo for the red lines of brine fly casings along the shoreline.  These bugs swarm in harmless clouds at their peak population in the summer, and are one part of the equation that makes Great Salt Lake a destination for birds.  The flies and their larvae, along with the brine shrimp, are the very foundation of fall migration.


Oh What a Night (top) and Sunset Sunday – 66. No matter where you stand during the shortening evenings of fall, this is the time of year when the sunsets are most spectacular.  Perhaps the changing colors of tree, grass, and salicornia are putting up too much competition, and the sun must respond in kind? Word to the wise: avoid being blinded while driving on east-west streets in the city by catching the unparalleled beauty of a sunset, lakeside!

Sunset Sunday 70. SNOW! The Wasatch Mountains have already seen the first snowfall of this water year (on August 23!), which is one more thing I look forward to in Autumn.  Here’s to warm fires, hot drinks, scarves, boots and the return of water that comes with winter snows.  And for all you skiers out there, may the Lake Effect be ever in your favor!

What are you looking forward to this fall?  What are your traditions?  Where will you celebrate the change of seasons?

Share

Leave a Comment

Share